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3D Printing in PUSD

PUSD•3D Imagine it…print it!

3D Printers in Pasadena Unified Schools

PUSD•3D


Did you know that PEF helped get 3D printers in every PUSD school? We did!
 

If you missed the KPCC Family Forum on our PUSD•3D Printers program you can watch it online.

Watch here >>

 

The Pasadena Educational Foundation is helping to create a new model for teaching innovation in PUSD schools with the introduction of 3D printing technology. Thanks to the support of a generous donor, incorporating 3D printers in the schools will give the students the opportunity to get their hands on next-gen technology so they can utilize their creativity and collaboration skills to help them be prepared for the jobs of tomorrow.

What is a 3D printer?

The concept is quite simple. Instead of printing one layer like on paper, a 3D printer melts plastic filament, then draws with it in a very fine layer. The printer then builds another fine layer of plastic on top of this one, and then another, and another, building your idea in slices from the bottom up until you have a plastic object ready to hold.

Why is access to 3D printer technology important for schools?

Access to 3D printing technology, or desktop fabrication, helps PUSD schools to become 21st century teaching environments with the ability to teach the skills that our students are going to need to be successful in the future.

In their 2013 report, the New Media Consortium (a global advisory board of education thought leaders) and the IEEE identified 3D printers in schools as one of the top technologies, trends, and challenges that will impact STEM+ education over the next five years.

Not only will 3D printers greatly impact STEM+ education but 3D printing paves the way for incredibly customized objects that will have an impact on a huge amount of industries.

Such as:

  • Medical and Pharmaceutical
  • Architecture
  • Entertainment, Gaming, and Film
  • Industrial
  • Consumer-products
  • And many more…
 
 

Image: 3D printed trumpet mouthpiece.
Marshall Fundamental School.

For the 2014-15 school year, all our PUSD campuses now have 3D printers.

How are the schools utilizing 3D printer technology?

Here are just a few ways the printers are being used right now:

Marshall Fundamental School-
Graphic Design teacher, Miguel Almena, has the printer in the Marshall Design Lab.

Here are some recent projects:

  • Trumpet mouthpieces for school band
  • Class designed projects including Iphone case, eyeglass holder, and headphone holder.

Wilson Middle School-

Currently, the printer is on Robotics and Algebra teacher, Jason Taylor's, desk. The Wilson 3D printer is constantly in motion making something for not only Mr. Taylor's classes but also for the school.

Here are some recent projects:

  • Developing a model of an eye for a special education teacher for a 7th grade science classes.
  • Violin bridges
  • For the Algebra I class PBL, students are going to be making a small roller coaster car. The project involves students using the Quadratic Equation to calculate the slope and equations.  The science teacher is also working on a roller coaster PBL where student's will be making instruments to measure the rate of change in speed (velocity) while on a ride and measure the altitude.

3D Printers in PUSD schools is just one of the many ways the Pasadena Educational Foundation helps to create a vibrant and enriching educational experience for all public school children in Pasadena, Altadena, and Sierra Madre. Our work is vital to our community and the future of our children. We exist with the support of our partners and donors who believe that strong schools build strong communities. Thank you.

Want to help?


Latest Updates:

 

3D at Marshall Fundamental School

In the news: Pasadena Now Marshall’s Holiday Concert Features Trumpets with 3D Printed Mouthpieces >> What would you create with a 3D printer? That is precisely the question Marshall Fundamental School teacher Miguel Almena asked his...